** Seasons Greetings! **This website will continue to accept orders throughout the festive season. Please check with the Royal Mail website for despatch information for the holiday period.

Diagram3D Products: Instructions for our products can be found within the product description.  Read the instructions (and watch our video) before ordering and there will be no hidden surprises.

  • Display:List/Grid
  • Show:
  • Sort By:
  • Refine Search

Downloads

This part of our website is devoted to useful information and articles. Download as many as you wish! We hope that you find them useful.

Many of the informative historical items here have been collated from articles and supplements published in "The Engineer" or "Engineering" periodicals since the 1850's. Public domain copies of these periodicals are available at Graces Guide

Please note that Instructions for our products can be found in the product description . 

GWR Gauge Conversion
Great Western Railway (GWR) Gauge conversion. This interesting article includes a brief history of the rationale behind the broad gauge and its planned, impending demise on Saturday 21st May, 1892. Includes a map of the GWR lines. "THE CONVERSION OF GAUGE ON THE GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY". "At midnight on Saturday, the 21st inst.,[1892]  the entire sectton of the Great Western Railway from Exeter to Falmouth, a. distance of 113 Â·miles, will be closed for traffic, and handed over to an army ..
GWR The Great Western Railway and Its Personnel 1960
"The Great Western Railway and Its Personnel By H . HOLCROFT PART 1 The scheme for a railway from London to Bristol received assent 125 years ago [in 1835]. In the article which follows the author deals with the broad gauge period of the Great Western Railway and the later acquisition of slandard gauge lines which made it necessary to introduce a mixed gauge. The years from 1863 to 1892 saw the spread of standard gauge to all parts of the system, and the first step lowards the Paddin..
GWR The Great Western Railway Supplement 1910
In 1910 "The Engineer" published an extensive supplement devoted to the Great Western Railway (GWR). There are numerous illustrations of the engines, rolling stock and architectural features of the line. This document focuses on the broad gauge era. It contains lists of locomotives and their classes. A "must have" for GWR enthusiasts. This document is broken down into sections to reduce server load. THE GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY. THE total length of the Great Western Railway permanent way is probably a..
LNWR 1868 Lime Street Station
The elevation and plan of this hotel, now in course of erection by the London and North-Western Railway Company, are from the designs of Mr. Waterhouse, 8, New Cavendish-street. The contractors for the works, Messrs. Haigh and Co., of Liverpool, are in full operation with the building, which is expected to be finished by January next. The design has been greatly modified from the original plan, so as to admit of the hotel being set back for the widening of Lime-street. A glass roof will be thrown over th..
LNWR 1875 Ballasting Machine
“Mr. Marsden of Leeds … we illustrate a machine which has special interest for a large class of our readers. The machine is designed especially for ballasting railways, and it has long been known that stone or slag properly broken and screened is a most excellent material for such purposes, giving a close road free from dust, whilst the material is left in the best possible form for binding together. The illustrations show the most modern adaptation of the Blake stone breaker for this purpose. ..
LNWR 1882 Compound Engine
The new compound locomotive invented by Mr. Webb, locomotive superintendent of the London and North Western Railway and constructed by him at Crewe. The engine has three cylinders, two high pressure, one of which is shown, 11 1/2 in. diameter and 24 in. stroke, which actuate the two trailing driving wheels. Under the smoke-box is placed a single low presseure cylinder 26in. diameter and 24 inch stroke which actuates the leading driving wheel. The engines are independent of each other in so far as the ..
LNWR Crewe Works, 1908
LNWR Crewe works, 1908. Many illustrations and diagrams. A "must have" for LNWR enthusiasts. To reduce server load this document has been spilt into several parts "THE LONDON AND NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY AND CREWE WORKS".  "The London and North-Western Ra.ilway, as it is to. day, is probahly historically the most interesting system of intercommunication ever constructed. Although many other railways came into existence about the same time, they all followed the example set them by the Stephenso..
NBR 1873 Sleeping Carriage
"RAILWAY SLEEPING CARRIAGE" The practice of attaching sleeping cars to long journey trains has prevailed for many years in America, and there are but few who travel frequently over our long northern routes who do not devoutly wish that a similar accommodation were afforded in England. It has indeed been a long recognised  necessity, and it is satisfactory to find that some step has recently been taken towards supplying the want. The North British Railway Company have taken the initiative in the matt..
NBR 1877 Goods Engine
We illustrate above a  ... type of goods engine, designed by Mr. Drummond, locomotive superintendent of the North British Railway, and constructed at the companies works at Cowlairs, near Glasgow. The engines are similar in external appearance to the new goods engines desiigned by Mr. Stroudley for the London and Brighton Railway, but are more powerful machines and considerably heavier. The work to be performed by these engines is very severe, as the grades are steep and very long, and the work has ..
NBR 1877 Passenger Engine
LOCOMOTIVE FOR THE NORTH BRITISH RAILWAY. We give this week a ...  engraving of one of a type of passenger locomotives recently constructed from the designs of Mr. Drummond, the locomotive superintendent of the North British Railway, for working the fast passenger traffic on that line. As will be seen from our illustration the engine is of the inside cylinder type with a single pair of driving wheels, the cylinders being 17 in. in diameter with 2 ft. stroke, and the driving wheels 7 ft.in diameter..
NBR 1878 Express Engine
EXPRESS PASSENGER ENGINE, NORTH BRITISH RAILWAY. The Hawick and Border Union Railway, uniting Carlisle with Edinburgh and Glasgow, constitutes one of the heaviest roads in the world worked by high speed passenger traffic, as will be seen from the sections on page 4. One incline of 1 in 70 is, in round numbers, seven miles long without a break worth mentioning; another of nearly eight miles rises at the rate of 1 in 75; a third incline equally steep is two miles long. It will be understood that to work th..
NBR 1879 440 Tank Engine
FOUR COUPLED BOGIE TANK ENGINE, NORTH BRITISH RAILWAY We illustrate above and on the next page a new type of engine, with 17in. cylinders, 26in. stroke, and four coupled 6ft. wheels, put to work on the North British Railway within the last few weeks.The bogie wheels are 3ft. 6in. diameter, and the total wheel base is 21ft. 1in. The engines were designed by Mr. D. Drummond, locomotive superintendent of the North British Railway, for working the coast traffic of the company, and they were built as they sho..
NBR 1879 Tank Engine
TANK ENGINE, NORTH BRITISH RAILWAY. "We give .. a two-page engraving, together with other Views on the present page, of a six-coupled tank locomotive for the North British Railway, constructed from the designs of Mr. D. Drummond, the locomotive superintendent of that line." ..
NER (ECJS) Steel Kitchen Car 1915
ALL-STEEL KITCHEN CAR, NORTH-EASTERN RAILWAY.  “In the equipment of two new trains provided by the East Coast companies-the Great Northern, North-Eastern and North-British- for the 10.0 a.m. service from King's Cross to Edinburgh and the corresponding 10.0 a.m. from Edinburgh to King's Cross an all-steel kitchen car is included. Part of the stock for the new trains was built at the Great Northern Company's shops at Doncaster under the supervision of Mr. H. N. Gresley, and the re..
NER 1869 Swing Bridge over River Ouse
"WE give this week a two-page illustration together, with other views on the present and opposite pages, of a. fine swing bridge, recently completed, and which carries what is now the main line of' the North-Eastern Railway, over the River Ouse, at a distance of about three miles from York, a point  where the river is navigable for small craft. The bridge consists of three openings, namely, one fixed span of 107ft. over all, and a double swing span of 176ft over all, leaving a clear openi..