This website uses cookies. By continuing you permit us to deploy cookies, as detailed in our Privacy Policy.  Accept
 

Search:

Products meeting the search criteria

Show:
Sort By:
GNR 1901 Nottingham Victoria Station
THE NEW VICTORIA STATION AT NOTTINGHAM. In the sixty-seventh volume of ENGINEERING we described and illustrated many of the important works on the Great Central Rail way extension to London …  we now return to the subject, principally to deal with the splendid joint station at Nottingham, the convenience of which has now been established by its use for some time by the two owning companies - the Great Central and the Great Northern.   This station is certainly the most important piece..
GNR 1913 Historical Supplement from "The Engineer"
Great Northern Railway supplement 1913. A "must have" for GNR fans. This document includes a summary history of the GNR and  includes maps, plans and diagrams. In order to reduce server load, this document has been split into several sections. Photographs of the classes of locomotives in use, including drawings of a large Atlantic locomotive are included. "THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY THERE is something exceedingly fascinating to a large number of per..
GNR 1921 Dining car set
A New Great Northern Dining Car Train. (1921) For many years past the Great Northern Railway Company’s line between London and the manufacturing towns in the West Riding of Yorkshire has been noted for comfort and convenience. The first dining car train to be run on a British railway was put into operation on the company’s London to Leeds route as far back as 1879, while in 1893 the ""G.N.R"" was the first to conceive the idea of running third class dining cars, though its..
GWR 1868 Much Wenlock Station
"PASSENGER STATIONS FOR COUNTRY TOWNS". - from "The Engineer" 1868 "The illustration ... of Much Wenlock passenger  booking office, waiting rooms, and station-master's residence combined, is a good example. of a suitable building of the class and has been recently completed on the Much Wenlock branch of the Great Western Railway, Shropshire, the contractors for which are Messrs. Brassey and Field. ... The building was desgned by Mr. J. Fogerty, M. Inst. C. E.,..
GWR 1876 222 Express Engine Standard Gauge
EXPRESS ENGINES FOR THE GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY. So much has been said lately concerning the engines used by giving the Great Western Railway Company in working their fast expresses that our readers will, no doubt, be interested in some information concerning the latest type of express engine used on this railway. By the courtesy of .Mr. Armstrong, locomotive superintendent of the line, we are enabled to illustrate … the new narrow gauge express engines, of which several have just been turned out fr..
GWR 1892 Gauge Conversion
Great Western Railway (GWR) Gauge conversion. This interesting article includes a brief history of the rationale behind the broad gauge and its planned, impending demise on Saturday 21st May, 1892. Includes a map of the GWR lines. "THE CONVERSION OF GAUGE ON THE GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY". "At midnight on Saturday, the 21st inst.,[1892]  the entire sectton of the Great Western Railway from Exeter to Falmouth, a. distance of 113 ·miles, will be closed for traffic, and h..
GWR 1910 The Great Western Railway Supplement
In 1910 "The Engineer" published an extensive supplement devoted to the Great Western Railway (GWR). There are numerous illustrations of the engines, rolling stock and architectural features of the line. This document focuses on the broad gauge era. It contains lists of locomotives and their classes. A "must have" for GWR enthusiasts. This document is broken down into sections to reduce server load. THE GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY. THE total length of the Great Western Railway permane..
GWR 1960 The Great Western Railway and Its Personnel
"The Great Western Railway and Its Personnel By H . HOLCROFT PART 1 The scheme for a railway from London to Bristol received assent 125 years ago [in 1835]. In the article which follows the author deals with the broad gauge period of the Great Western Railway and the later acquisition of slandard gauge lines which made it necessary to introduce a mixed gauge. The years from 1863 to 1892 saw the spread of standard gauge to all parts of the system, and the first step lowards the P..
LNWR 1868 Lime Street Station
The elevation and plan of this hotel, now in course of erection by the London and North-Western Railway Company, are from the designs of Mr. Waterhouse, 8, New Cavendish-street. The contractors for the works, Messrs. Haigh and Co., of Liverpool, are in full operation with the building, which is expected to be finished by January next. The design has been greatly modified from the original plan, so as to admit of the hotel being set back for the widening of Lime-street. A glass roof will be thrown over th..
LNWR 1875 Ballasting Machine
“Mr. Marsden of Leeds … we illustrate a machine which has special interest for a large class of our readers. The machine is designed especially for ballasting railways, and it has long been known that stone or slag properly broken and screened is a most excellent material for such purposes, giving a close road free from dust, whilst the material is left in the best possible form for binding together. The illustrations show the most modern adaptation of the Blake stone breaker for this purpose. ..
LNWR 1882 Compound Engine
The new compound locomotive invented by Mr. Webb, locomotive superintendent of the London and North Western Railway and constructed by him at Crewe. The engine has three cylinders, two high pressure, one of which is shown, 11 1/2 in. diameter and 24 in. stroke, which actuate the two trailing driving wheels. Under the smoke-box is placed a single low presseure cylinder 26in. diameter and 24 inch stroke which actuates the leading driving wheel. The engines are independent of each other in so far as the ..
LNWR 1908 Crewe Works
LNWR Crewe works, 1908. Many illustrations and diagrams. A "must have" for LNWR enthusiasts. To reduce server load this document has been spilt into several parts "THE LONDON AND NORTH-WESTERN RAILWAY AND CREWE WORKS".  "The London and North-Western Ra.ilway, as it is to. day, is probahly historically the most interesting system of intercommunication ever constructed. Although many other railways came into existence about the same time, they all followed the example ..
LSR 1904 (Liverpool & Southport Railway) Electrification
THE ELECTRIFICATION OF THE LIVERPOOL AND SOUTHPORT RAILWAY.  The railway companies of this country have keenly felt the competition which the advent of electric tramways has caused, and have sought means to protect themselves against it. A number of things have been suggested so as while not reducing the speed of the trains, to keep down expenses to such a point as would enable the fares charged to be reduced to the level of, or even below, the small charges made by the tramways. There have been..
MET 1866 Metropolitan District Railway  (Inner Circle)
THE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT RAILWAY (1866)  The present Metropolitan Railway, extending from Bishop’s-road to Moorgate-street, forms, as is very generally known, but the northern side of an irregular "circle" of underground railways which will surround that part of the metropolis lying between the existing line and the Thames. Of this "inner circle", as it is called, the Metropolitan District Railway will form the southern side, whilst the eastern and western portions wi..
MET 1868 Metropolitan Railway Widened Lines
THE WIDENING OF THE METROPOLITAN RAILWAY (1868) The widening of the Metropolitan Railway between King’s-cross and Farringdon-street stations, with the deviations of the branches to the Great Northern Railway, has been practically completed, and on the 15th of January was formally inspected by Captain Tyler on behalf of the Board of Trade.  A constantly increasing traffic has rendered this extension necessary, and the new lines are intended for the service of the Great Western, Great Northe..